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That the reality that we saw about us every day was one reality, and a valid one – but that there were others, different perspectives where different things have meaning that were just as valid.That had a profound effect on me." In the late 1960s Moore began publishing his own poetry and essays in fanzines, eventually setting up his own fanzine, Embryo.During that decade, Moore helped to bring about greater social respectability for comics in the United States and United Kingdom.In the late 1980s and early 1990s he left the comic industry mainstream and went independent for a while, working on experimental work such as the epic From Hell, the pornographic Lost Girls, and the prose novel Voice of the Fire.Meanwhile, Moore had also begun writing minor stories for Doctor Who Weekly, and later commented that "I really, really wanted a regular strip. And, looking back, it was the best possible education that I could have had in how to construct a story." From 1980 through to 1984, Moore maintained his status as a freelance writer, and was offered a spate of work by a variety of comic book companies in Britain, namely Marvel UK, and the publishers of 2000AD and Warrior.He later remarked that "I remember that what was generally happening was that everybody wanted to give me work, for fear that I would just be given other work by their rivals. The story, which Moore described as "continuing the tradition of Dennis the Menace, but giving him a thermonuclear capacity", Co-created with artist Ian Gibson, the series was set in the 50th century. Another comic company to employ Moore was Marvel UK, who had formerly purchased a few of his one-off stories for Doctor Who Weekly and Star Wars Weekly.Abandoning his office job, he decided to instead take up both writing and illustrating his own comics.He had already produced a couple of strips for several alternative fanzines and magazines, such as Anon E. Pancras Panda, a parody of Paddington Bear, for the Oxford-based Back Street Bugle.

Illustrated by David Lloyd, Moore was influenced by his pessimistic feelings about the Thatcherite Conservative government, which he projected forward as a fascist state in which all ethnic and sexual minorities had been eliminated.He has occasionally used such pseudonyms as Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, and Translucia Baboon; also, reprints of some of his work have been credited to The Original Writer when Moore requested that his name be removed.Moore started writing for British underground and alternative fanzines in the late 1970s before achieving success publishing comic strips in such magazines as 2000 AD and Warrior.Whilst having no need for another writer on Judge Dredd, which was already being written by John Wagner, 2000AD's editor Alan Grant saw promise in Moore's work – later remarking that "this guy's a really fucking good writer" – and instead asked him to write some short stories for the publication's Future Shocks series.

While the first few were rejected, Grant advised Moore on improvements, and eventually accepted the first of many. I was being offered short four or five-page stories where everything had to be done in those five pages.

Through Embryo, Moore became involved in a group known as the Northampton Arts Lab.